Kids

Meet Rally Kid Keren. Again.

Meet Rally Kid Keren. Again.

Yes, you have met her before. Five years ago, Rally Kid Keren was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue cancer. Her fight included chemotherapy, radiation and an amputation. Throughout treatment Keren showed her resilience and kept a positive outlook. With the unwavering support of her parents, Kelly and Jonathan, and her older brother Jacob and younger sister Lyla, Keren rang the bell in 2019. She had to continue with physical therapy and deal with multiple side effects from her treatment. A heavy blow came in 2021 to Keren, her family and friends. Doctors diagnosed Keren with a new cancer, osteosarcoma, a bone cancer. Unfortunately, it is a side effect of her initial cancer treatment. Cancer. Again. More brutal chemotherapy. Radical shoulder surgery. So many nights in the hospital. Missed the first semester of high school. But, through it all Keren remained resilient and...

read more
Pediatric Cancer Dad Discovers a Promising Novel Approach to Wilms’ Tumors

Pediatric Cancer Dad Discovers a Promising Novel Approach to Wilms’ Tumors

Rally Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research (Rally) likes funding outside-the-box ideas and, at times, funding outside-of-the-box researchers: those who we normally not consider as a scientific researcher. Rally is thrilled to share recent developments from an outside-the-box researcher and his study of Wilms’ Tumor. The study emerges from the Children’s Cancer Therapy Development Institute (cc-TDI) in Beaverton, Oregon, in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Rally-funded researcher Andy Woods leads the study published in Pediatric Blood & Cancer (link Pediatric Blood & Cancer). But first, who is this outside-of-the-box researcher Andy Woods? Andy Woods is a college-educated stone and tile mason from Montana. He is also a Dad. A dad who heard the devasting words, “Your child has cancer.” When his daughter, Stellablue, was four years old, she was...

read more
One step at a time, one prayer at a time

One step at a time, one prayer at a time

Normal is defined as conforming to a standard; usual, typical or expected. My name is Sarah Gossling and I am one of Rally Kid Grant’s older sisters. Almost eight years ago, on June 18, 2014, my brother was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma. My world was shattered. I was about to go into third grade when Grant was diagnosed, and I can remember trying to keep any bit of the normalcy that I had before I learned the word cancer. Before Grant was diagnosed, we were your average family. Four kids (and one addition later on), a whole lot of crazy, and not a care in the world. We loved traveling and going on adventures. We loved to swim together, play together and drive mom and dad crazy. If you caught us on a good day and the house was clean, it wouldn't be long before my brothers Grant and James were making messes. We were just kids being kids. Once Grant was diagnosed, it was harder to...

read more
My View Looking Forward

My View Looking Forward

Before cancer, I was never a morning person, but now I love waking up in my home with the entire family under one roof. Most nights, I wake up around 3 am in a panic. Did I dream up this terrible nightmare that my 4-year-old son had cancer and had four inches of his leg cut off? I rush to Gus’s room to check on him and sometimes lay next to him. I tell him I love him to the moon and back and that I am so proud of him. I know these moments are what matter most in life. Right now, it is easy to get sidetracked by arguments over vaccine hesitancy or mask mandates that are still in place. I wish everyone would slow down and view this as an opportunity to help their neighbor. Believe me, it could be so much worse. I have watched a handful of families lose their children to childhood cancer and have been humbled and blessed by their friendship.  We share the common bond of childhood cancer....

read more
Discovering the Reality of Childhood Cancer Treatment

Discovering the Reality of Childhood Cancer Treatment

On our diagnosis day, we were told that our four-year-old Gus had Ewing Sarcoma. What doctors didn’t know was the particular type or variant he had. Tumor Sequencing Tumor sequencing is vital, as some variants of Ewing’s sarcomas have poorer outcomes, require specific drugs, and prohibit the use of other drugs. The variant determines the treatment plan. Parents need to know the type of cancer their child is fighting- and if the hospital doesn’t know, parents should demand to have the tumor genetically sequenced. As Dean taught me, “The pathology report is king.” Treatment I could go on and on about the horrors of the treatment Gus endured: scary nights when our son’s heart was beating so fast it seemed as though he was having a heart attack… or beating so slowly that he was unresponsive; the endless needle pokes for blood and platelet transfusions; the horrific bowel movement issues;...

read more
Rally Kid Lex Dreams of Being a Hematology Oncologist

Rally Kid Lex Dreams of Being a Hematology Oncologist

Why do we Rally for Childhood Cancer Research? The simple answer is #ForTheirFuture. When we fund the best and most promising research studies, our deepest hope is that we’ll find better treatments with fewer long-term side effects, and one day, a cure for all childhood cancers. Rally, with your help, gives hope to all of the kids and families who are bravely battling childhood cancer, so they can dream of a future without harmful treatments, endless hospital stays and pain (both mental and physical) that lasts long after the cancer has gone. Rally Kid Lex is one of those children who has always had big dreams for the future, and if you’ve been following along with his story, you probably know that he’s not the type of kid to let cancer get in the way. After being diagnosed with ALL, the most common childhood cancer, Lex and his family knew they had a long battle ahead of them. His...

read more

$

Sign up for our emails!

Fill out my online form.

Recent Posts

Kids

Meet Rally Kid Keren. Again.

Meet Rally Kid Keren. Again.

Yes, you have met her before. Five years ago, Rally Kid Keren was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue cancer. Her fight included chemotherapy, radiation and an amputation. Throughout treatment Keren showed her resilience and kept a positive outlook. With the unwavering support of her parents, Kelly and Jonathan, and her older brother Jacob and younger sister Lyla, Keren rang the bell in 2019. She had to continue with physical therapy and deal with multiple side effects from her...

read more
Pediatric Cancer Dad Discovers a Promising Novel Approach to Wilms’ Tumors

Pediatric Cancer Dad Discovers a Promising Novel Approach to Wilms’ Tumors

Rally Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research (Rally) likes funding outside-the-box ideas and, at times, funding outside-of-the-box researchers: those who we normally not consider as a scientific researcher. Rally is thrilled to share recent developments from an outside-the-box researcher and his study of Wilms’ Tumor. The study emerges from the Children’s Cancer Therapy Development Institute (cc-TDI) in Beaverton, Oregon, in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center....

read more
One step at a time, one prayer at a time

One step at a time, one prayer at a time

Normal is defined as conforming to a standard; usual, typical or expected. My name is Sarah Gossling and I am one of Rally Kid Grant’s older sisters. Almost eight years ago, on June 18, 2014, my brother was diagnosed with stage 4 neuroblastoma. My world was shattered. I was about to go into third grade when Grant was diagnosed, and I can remember trying to keep any bit of the normalcy that I had before I learned the word cancer. Before Grant was diagnosed, we were your average family. Four...

read more
My View Looking Forward

My View Looking Forward

Before cancer, I was never a morning person, but now I love waking up in my home with the entire family under one roof. Most nights, I wake up around 3 am in a panic. Did I dream up this terrible nightmare that my 4-year-old son had cancer and had four inches of his leg cut off? I rush to Gus’s room to check on him and sometimes lay next to him. I tell him I love him to the moon and back and that I am so proud of him. I know these moments are what matter most in life. Right now, it is easy to...

read more
Discovering the Reality of Childhood Cancer Treatment

Discovering the Reality of Childhood Cancer Treatment

On our diagnosis day, we were told that our four-year-old Gus had Ewing Sarcoma. What doctors didn’t know was the particular type or variant he had. Tumor Sequencing Tumor sequencing is vital, as some variants of Ewing’s sarcomas have poorer outcomes, require specific drugs, and prohibit the use of other drugs. The variant determines the treatment plan. Parents need to know the type of cancer their child is fighting- and if the hospital doesn’t know, parents should demand to have the tumor...

read more
Rally Kid Lex Dreams of Being a Hematology Oncologist

Rally Kid Lex Dreams of Being a Hematology Oncologist

Why do we Rally for Childhood Cancer Research? The simple answer is #ForTheirFuture. When we fund the best and most promising research studies, our deepest hope is that we’ll find better treatments with fewer long-term side effects, and one day, a cure for all childhood cancers. Rally, with your help, gives hope to all of the kids and families who are bravely battling childhood cancer, so they can dream of a future without harmful treatments, endless hospital stays and pain (both mental and...

read more

$

Sign up for our emails!

Fill out my online form.

Recent Posts

Volunteers are the heart of Rally's mission!

 

Enter your email below to receive details about our volunteer opportunities.

Thank you for your interest in volunteering with Rally! You should receive an email shortly with additional details.

X